Tree v. Nature

The living plant v. the dead one. In nature, not everything’s fair, as other plants and animals live greater and longer lives than others. Sometimes they take the resources other organisms need, and sometimes they just do better.
The living plant v. the dead one. In nature, not everything’s fair,
as other plants and animals live greater and longer lives than others.
Sometimes they take the resources other organisms need, and
sometimes they just do better.
While it may not be clearly stated, there is power in setting restrictions and creating limitations. The lock on this gate is a sign for people to not try and enter a property, and gives off a signal of that the homeowner will be able to respond if you decide to do something.
While it may not be clearly stated, there is power in setting restrictions
and creating limitations. The lock on this gate is a sign for people to
not try and enter a property, and gives off a signal of that the homeowner
will be able to respond if you decide to do something.
Gates are very similar, in that they are a not-written out way to tell people to “back off.” This form of a barricade, that’s much more formal and sturdy, shows that this house may have more protection than their neighbors.
Gates are very similar, in that they are a not-written out way to
tell people to “back off.” This form of a barricade, that’s much more
formal and sturdy, shows that this house may have
more protection than their neighbors.
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Nature has so much more power than we think, as this broken tree branch illustrates. The wind and heavy rain from storms the night before had the power to damage the tree, something that we humans see as something somewhat indestructible and strong.
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A man walking his dog shows a more direct form of power. He holds the leash, which, for the most part, controls the dog’s movement and direction. But, then again, it does come into question whether or not the dog has more control. If the animal becomes invested in chasing another animal or object, he has the ability to pull the person in their direction.
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Another more indirect form of power can be seen in communities. The “bigger” house looks more powerful and grand from the street than the “smaller” house does, and gives off a stronger sense of control.

Artist’s Statement

As a photographer, my goal is to capture moments that represent a mood or theme. In this case, the theme was power. When thinking about it at first, the task seemed daunting, and as though I was not going to be able to find much to photograph. But as I ventured my neighborhood with my camera at hand, I ended up surprising myself.

In the play Antigone written by Sophocles, power is one of the most prominent themes in the text. Creon, the king of Thebes, uses it without thinking about the consequences, and in the end, loses all of his family and loved ones to poor decisions that he made. In the play, power is seen as something mostly negative, but in the world we live in today, it can be seen as either good or bad, depending on who possesses it.

Before taking my photos, I tried to map out how power could be shown through images. I could take pictures of powerful people. Of powerful businesses. Of powerful objects, such as money and documents. While actually going out and taking photos, though, I began to realize that power meant so much more than just the material ideas.

Power can be seen in nature. In neighbors. In relationships between man and animal. In rules. Power is much more than somebody or something who has rule over a community. As shown in one of my photos, I found power in the fallen tree branch. Nature had the ability to take something we view as being so strong and immense, a tree, and easily break it. Another photo taken is of two houses next to one another, one bigger, one smaller. The larger house, from the view of a passerby, gives an impression of being more “important,” compared to the smaller house next to it. The difference between these two photos is that one shows power in nature, the other in community.

This project is one I’ve really enjoyed this semester, since it let me, as well as my peers, choose whatever their strong suits were to showcase their interpretation of Antigone, and it’s a good project to let students show some creativity with.

As you really start to look at the things around you, you see what seems to have bigger influence in communities. A cat is more powerful than a mouse, and a living plant more powerful than a dead one. Think about it a little more, and you begin to wonder if something has too much power. But that, lies in the eyes of the beholder.

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3 thoughts on “Tree v. Nature

  1. I like your photos and they really relate to the power in Antigone. My favorite picture is the lock on the fence, and I think that image was a good representation of power. 🙂 Overall really nice and great photography DANANANANANA

    Like

  2. I really enjoyed looking at your photo essay. It was really surprising to me how much I was able to interpret and understand just by looking at images. I think you did a really good job of explaining your thoughts because I felt I was able to really understand your thoughts on power as well as make new opinions myself. I also like that you took photos of everyday objects because that kind of make they concept of power a lot more relatable. Your photo essay made me realize that the concept of power is present in everyday life a lot more than we might recognize.

    Like

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